Ceiling Tile Soldering

by Jimmy O'
(Orange County, Ca.)

A very inexpensive and easy way to prepare for soldering your project and not pushing pins or hammering nails into your board is as follows purchase a ceiling tile 2Ft. by 4 ft. cut with razor knife to approx the size you need. Lay your pattern on tile and secure with push pins.Place foiled or camed pcs.on pattern and solder as usual. Tile is fire proof and will not burn.This can be used over and over again, and your board stays like new for cutting glass with a nice level surface

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Surface for scoring glass

by Mickie
(Texas)

I bought a role of the rubber waffle weave cabinet shelving cover. This cushions the glass just enough for scoring as I have tiled my table. When I am finished, it is easy to kind of shake it and the tiny shards fall on the tile. I will put the shelving cover under water and spray it in case there are any left. Plus it lasts forever.

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Cutting platform

by Lori Shumey
(Castlegar, BC)

The platform that I use is a 2x4 foot florescent light grid cover. You can buy this at any hardware store that carries lighting. I place it on an 1/8" piece of mahogany that is the same size as the grid. When you are cutting larger pieces of glass, any shards and slivers fall into the little grid squares. For smaller pieces, I cut my glass on a shelf liner. It is the kind that you use to keep objects from sliding around. I have also glued this shelf liner on my aluminum ruler to keep it from sliding on my glass.

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Create a Jig for Round and Oval Pieces

by Joan
(Virginia)

I did not have good results when I tried to hold my pieces in place using pushpins, as most books instruct. So I created a jig (frame) for rounded pieces using aluminum flashing. It worked very well. This is how you can do it:
1. Measure the circumference of your pattern.
2. Cut a 1" strip of alumimum flashing the length of the circumference using a heavy duty scissors or tin snip.
3. Along the length of the strip, snip about 1/2 way through at 1/4" or 1/2" increments.
4. After you have snipped the entire length of the strip, fold the strip lengthwise into an L shape(one side of the fold should be solid, the other side should be snipped).
5. Fit the strip along your pattern, creating a vertical border and letting the snipped pieces fan or overlap as needed.
6. Use duct tape (or your tape of choice) to hold the tin strip in place.

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Assembling Round Sained Glass Projects.


I take the radius of my round project and draw a circle with a compass on a peice of plywood, jig it out and sand the edges. Keep the circle whole for copper foil work or half it for lead came. Just nail it to your board and boom, you can assemble with out fear. For lead came works, solder half and turn to keep the same roundness to it. Just make sure it's truely round before assembly.

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Cutting Base

by Mona McClendon
(Springville, AL)

I bought a panel of plastic grid that usually goes over a drop-ceiling light fixture and use it to lay my glass on when I'm cutting. Any small slivers of glass go down into the squares and don't slow up my cutting process by having to sweep them away before laying down another piece of glass to cut. When I've cut everything that I'm going to, I lift the plastic grid and sweep up all the bits of glass.

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