Using White Out/Correction Pen

by Mickie
(Texas)

I use the White Out correction pen for marking glass. It is always white and with just a little practice you will learn how to do a thin line, otherwise, you grind to almost the end of the white. Once dry (a few seconds) it does not come off with either the cutting oil or water from the grinder. I often take it off with a blade, or slightly rough cleaning sponge. Sometimes I do not cut my glass right away, and it does not wipe off or fade away.

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Keep those marks!

by Connie
(California)

I wish someone had told me a few tips when I was learning stained glass. One of the tips that I learned later on was using chapstick or beeswax.

When marking your pattern on glass, use a permanent marker. Then cover those lines with chapstick or beeswax to keep them from disappearing when you are using a grinder.

This really saves re-marking the pattern, which is what my daughter and I did over and over. Sure glad someone finally told me about this handy trick.

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Keeping on Mark When Grinding

by Judi
(Oklahoma)

When I trace my pieces with a Sharpie I still, on occasion, have some pieces which are cut a little on the long side. I already have the sharpie lines to guide me when I have to grind. However, the water from the grinder tends to wash off the sharpie lines.

I got this tip from a gentleman who has been working with glass for years. Trace over your sharpie line with chap-stick and the sharpe ink will not wash off. You can now grind to the proper shape.

Just remimber to mark this tube of chap stick so it is NOT used for any other purpose.

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