Sratches on mirrors

by WendyLou
(UK)

I have been using mirror from Ikea in my stained glass work. After soldering I wash them using a scouring pad and they are fine - but quite a few have ever so slight scratches on following polishing! Is it the mirrors, the polish or the cloth?? Is there a Best type of mirror to use?

Thanks

Answer

I think the scouring pad is scratching the mirror. The polish makes the scratches show up.

You can get mirror from your local window glass, glass repair shop. They usually carry mirror as well as window glass.

Here's a tutorial on Working With Mirror It should answer some of your questions.

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Mirrored Glass

by Cheryl
(Moses Lake, Wa)

How did you treat mirrored glass so that it does not
bleed?

Answer

Cover the edges and back of the mirror with mirror sealant. It's available at most stained glass supply shops. Make sure you overlap it slightly onto the front of the mirror. You must cover every place the mirror has chipped during cutting or grinding. I actually do 2 coats just to be on the safe side.

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finishing a stained glass mirror

by Seymour Bayuk
(Baltimore MD USA)

I am finishing a stained glass mirror witk zinc came. Do I place copper foil on the mirror glass edges before I place the zinc came on the edges?

Answer
No, you don't need to foil the edges of the glass. However, you must solder the zinc to the mirror wherever there is a solder line touching it.

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Black spot on mirrors

by Antoinette
(Ireland)

I have been making mirrors for a good few years but every now and then black spot appears after a while on some not all of the mirrors. I have been using nail varnish as a sealant, I was just wondering if you could tell me what type to use. I have found CRL Gunther Seal-Kwik Mirror Edge Sealer on the internet but unfortunately I cannot get it here in Ireland.
Many thanks for your great site.
Regards,
Antoinette

Answer

I Googled mirror edge sealants and came up with This Page of available sealants. Perhaps you can find one of them in Ireland. Whatever you use, make sure you seal on to the back edge as well. When you cut mirror, minute chips of the backing come off when you break out the pieces and give entry to the contaminates that cause the black rot. Sealing along the back will cover those chips. I actually seal the entire back of mirror glass.

If you can't find any of the sealants, try a polyurethane spray.

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Mirror Flux

Hello, I learned stained glass 25 years ago. We used a product called Mirror Flux and had no problem with the silvering of the mirror going dark. I have been unable to find this flux. Can you help?
Linn

Answer

Hi Linn,

I don't know of Mirror Flux as such, but you can use any non-acid flux such as Canfield Solder Magic Gel Flux, Laco Paste Flux, Safety Flux, or La-Co Brite Flux. Tallow is also a very safe, natural, non toxic and acid free flux.

As you might already know, black rot, those black spots that you see around a mirror, is caused by the tarnish of the metals used to make the reflective surface. As soon as the mirror is cut, the edges become exposed to various corrosive agents. Ammonia in glass cleaner, the acid in flux and patina, even the adhesive backing on copper foil may corrode the mirror backing.

You must protect the mirror edges with a sealant. Mirror edge sealants and silver protectors are available through most stained glass suppliers. Even a good, high quality varnish or unbleached shellac will work. Be sure to coat all exposed edges of the glass before foiling or leading. For an extra measure, I coat the entire back of the mirror. This protects the back and helps to prevent scratches.

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Mirrored glass

by kathazina
(California)

Is there a certain way to cut mirrored glass?

Answer

Cut on the mirrored surface, not the back side.

If you received my last ezine, the techniques article is all about working with mirror. When you sign up for the ezine, you have access to all of the back issues.

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How do you protect mirror backing?

by Janet
(London, Ontario)

When using pieces of mirror in foiled projects, I would like to know haw to protect the mirror backing - it seems to become damaged around the edges from flux or solder.

Answer

Scroll down on this page Working With Mirror. You will see the tutorial for working with mirror. The techniques apply to any mirror you're working with, whether it's small pieces incorporated in a panel or a decorative mirror.

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mirror tile keeps showing black spots

my mosaic mirror tile keeps geting black spots .the art work is beautifull but after some weeks the black spots
show up . why

Answer

It happens because the edges aren't sealed. Moisture gets between the actual glass and the backing, especially where there are chips, and causes the black spots over time. You will often see this in old bathroom mirrors.

There are several products available to seal the edges. One is CRL Mirror Edge Sealant which is in a spray can. You can get it from most stained glass suppliers.

I turn my mirror up-side-down, so the back side is up. I lay the mirror on something that will lift it up so I can get at the edges easily and something that I don't mind getting the spray on. Quite often the cap from the spray can works well. Then I spray the entire back of the mirror and the edges, let it dry and do it again. This will protect the edges plus any place on the back that has been chipped during cutting or grinding.

I don't grind mirror unless it is absolutely necessary because grinding always chips the edges.

You can read more about working with mirror Here

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