Waterproof Marking Pens for English Method

by Cathy O.
(Saint Cloud, Florida)

I want to try the English method - tracing patterns onto my glass instead of cutting out individual pattern pieces. I currently use the Sharpie markers and they work well until wet. I would like to know if there are any markers that are a little more water proof/resistant? Any help would be appreciated.


Answer

Some people rub Chap Stick over the lines, or there is a product, Mark Stay 2, made specifically for keeping pen lines intact through grinding and sawing. It's available from most online stained glass suppliers.

Other than that, I don't know of any marker that's waterproof, but you could use a paint pen. Zig Painty Markers and Pens are available from most craft stores. The paint does hold up through grinding.

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Lantern

by Caroline
(Croxley Green, UK)

I am planning a 4-sided porch lantern. It is 15 x 21 cm on each side. What would you recommend I use on the top and bottom edges.Would U-channel lead be ok or should I use zinc, would it be stronger? Any tips would be gratefully received as I can't find any instructions on the internet.

Answer

Solder an 18 gauge copper wire around the top and bottom. You can also solder the same wire inside along each joining seam between each panel. Cut the wire the full length (from top edge to bottom edge) of each seams. Now when you solder the wires around the top and bottom, the internal wires will attach to them, giving you a secure "framework" for the lantern.

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Scrap Glass and Wind Chimes

by Jack
(Bridgeport, CT (USA))

Hi Sue,

Is it feasible (as in technically possible) to use stained glass (especially remnants) to make windchimes, OR is there "glass" other than what you would use for stained glass work that is better suited?

Thank You,
Jack
Bridgeport, CT

Answer

Hi Jack,

Yes, you can make windchimes from any stained glass. I have several chimes on my back patio made from scrap glass and some of my torchwork glass beads.

You do need to get them down when there's a high wind. I have one set that has several broken pieces due to the wind.

You can make them as intricate or as plain as you want. If you have access to a kiln, you can heat the glass to make the edges smooth, but it's not necessary to do so.

Do a Google Images search for "stained glass wind chimes" You'll see lots of pictures and get many ideas for ways to make them.

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Repair

by Debbie
(Wisconsin)

Hi Sue, I just finished a project for a special relative of mine and noticed one area had a small graze in the glass, I have repaired it once already(same piece), must be a pressure point or perhaps the glass itself!!!! I just noticed it is grazed again in the same piece! Its already framed in came and a wood frame around it. I dont want to try to repair it again, so I am wondering if you have any suggestions as far as some kind of glue or another way to maybe "hide" the graze. I sent you a picture, its hard to see. The graze is in the sun, very small, but I know its there! I would appreciate any advise you have for me. Thanks Debbie Mullikin

Answer

I believe I see it...it's a crack that runs diagonally from the right top to the bottom center.

Unfortunately, there is no glue that will fix it. Actually there is a glue, but it is extremely expensive (about $50) and needs special equipment to mix it a to apply it. You can get it Here

It would be much easier and cheaper to repair it. Perhaps you could use a different yellow glass. The one you are using looks like it has striations in it which can cause a crack if they are placed at a pressure point or at a place where hot solder will be in contact with them.

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clean a big project

by ran
(israel)

How do I clean a big project after I finish soldering before patina.

Answer

Try washing it in the bathtub. Put a toewl in the bottom of the tub first. If it's larger than the tub take it outdoors and wash it using the garden hose.

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CARBORUNDEM STONE

by lynn
(wareham, ma)


Where can I buy one of these? Does a hardware store have them? Also glass nippers?

Answer

Hardware stores and places like the fishing and hunting department at Walmart should have the stones. Glass nippers are available from most stained glass shops or you can get them on-line from any of the stained glass suppliers. Also try Hobby Lobby if there is one close to you. They carry some stained glass supplies.

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Finding curved or bent glass

I am new to stained glass and it just dawned on me that some of the glass I see in some projects are curved and I realized I wanted to use it in my project also. Where do I find bent/curved glass. Thank you very much.

Answer

If you are talking about a single piece of glass that is curved or bent, you will need to bend it in a kiln.

If you are referring to an entire project that is curved, it can be constructed around a curved form that you would make either from polystyrene, or just about anything around the house that is the shape you want.

You can use metal or plastic bowls, cans, jars, bottles, just about anything you can think of. Cover the entire surface with masking tape before you start constructing your project.

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Garden Stakes

by Linda
(Lincolnton, NC)

I want to make some garden stakes as gifts for my gardening friends. Will copper foil pieces hold up outdoors or should I use lead? And if I use lead, does the piece have to be cemented and finished or will it hold up outdoors without sealing?

Answer

Copper foil will be fine. I have foiled garden stakes I made 5 years ago that are in excellent condition.

If you did them in lead, yes they should be puttied. The glass is loose in unputtied leaded pieces and with wind, etc, the lead would stretch and the glass would eventually fall out. Foil is a much better option for garden stakes.

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Weatherproof?

by Ladybug Barb
(Atlanta,Ga. USA)

Can stained glass panels hang outside unprotected?

Answer

Yes. Put them in an area where they won't be subjected to strong wind (take them down if there is going to be a severe storm with high winds). Also, wax the panel well before hanging it outdoors. The wax will protect the solder and or lead from oxidation caused by rain. That's not to say they'll never oxidize, but the wax will delay oxidation for a long time.

If the panel has any hinge joints (a straight or fairly straight line going from one edge of the panel to the other), make sure they are sufficiently reinforced.

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what is colour magic? can you paint it over solder. thanks

by margaret
(south australia)

what is colour magic, can it be painted over solder.
thanks margaret

Color Magic is a paint made specifically for stained glass work. It comes in a lot of colors and you can get each color in transparent, opaque, or glitter.

It is something I have frequently used to embellish my work. For example, when I make kaleidoscopes, I paint flowers on clear nuggets to use in the wheels, and I use it for facial features on panels and suncatchers.

I have used it on solder, for decorative purposes, like the edges of my 3-D flowers, but I've never used it on a completed panel.

You can see the range of colors Here You will see an O, T, or G after each color name. They stands for transparent, opaque or glitter.

The only drawback is that it fades in sunlight, but there is a UV protective coat you can use to prevent that from happening.

It is fun to use, and it really makes you work unique.

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adding glass marbles or other glass stones

How do you add marbles or glass stones to a project?

Answer

You can add marbles and stones to any project by wrapping foil around the edge of stones and either the middle or one end of marbles depending on whether you want the marble to stick out evenly on both sides, or stick out totally on the front of the project.

Rough up the surface that will be foiled, so the foil has something to hold on to. Stones and marbles have a very smooth surface, unlike the edges of glass that has been cut, and foil slides off very easily if the surface isn't rough. You can rough it up with your grinder or by rubbing it with a carborundum stone.

The only problem with marbles is the fact that the project won't lay flat. You can work on it using thick styrofoam that has holes dug out for the marbles to sit in so it will lay flat.

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Shining edges of cut glass after grinding

by Mary
(Arkansas)

I would like to glue some pieces of cut glass to a bird house I painted. I am going to run the pieces gently against the grinder to get rid of sharp edges so you don't get cut picking up the bird house. How can I get the dullness from grinding shiny again so it looks prettier. It there a polish or something I should use?

Answer

There are bevelling machines available that would polish the edges of the glass, but that's a huge investment. Short of that, there's no way to do it economically.

Instead of the grinder, use a carborundum stone to take down the sharp edges. Hold the stone at an angle and quickly run it down both edges on all sides of the glass. It will dull the outer edges, but the majority of the face of the edge will remain shiny.

You could also do it mosaic style and put cement between the pieces. Mosaic cement can be colored, some even comes already colored, so it would look pretty (and you don't have to worry about the edges!). Look for mosaic cement at most hobby stores.

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Copper foil or lead came

by Imo Kalla
(Freeport, MN)

I have a 21 x 36 in window in a garage entry door that I would like to make a stained glass piece to fit over the existing double pane window. The door opens and closes a lot so am wondering if I can do copper foil or if I have to make a lead came project? I have found some pattern that I really like but they have a lot of smaller pieces so copper foil would be much easier.

Also given the size would I have to reinforce it with rebar?

Answer

You should use lead for the door. Foil does not give at all and with a door opening and closing the panel will "oil can" (think of what happens to the can when you squeeze an oil can). Lead and putty will cushion the glass and give with the movement.

Yes, you need to reinforce that panel both internally with copper restrip and externally with either a re-rod or a re-bar. If you don't know how to reinforce, I have a new ebook out about reinforcement. You can see what's in it at Here

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Which way round

Please could you tell me, I'm just making two windows either side of a front door. The front door is protected by a porch. When installing the glass window does the texture of the glass go inside the house or does it face outwards.

Answer

It's really a matter of choice...whichever side you like best can face inside.

The theory is that if the textured side faces outside, it will refract the sun through the texture and make the glass sparkle, similar to sun shining through a crystal. Since your windows will be under a roof, they probably won't have much sun shining through them so it doesn't matter which side faces inside.

Most windows are viewed more often from the inside than the outside so put whichever side looks best, or you like best, facing inside.

No matter which side faces in or out, they will look beautiful during the day from the inside. At night, they will look spectacular from the outside with light shining through them.

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Brass rods or tubes

by Judy
(Brampton Ontario Canada)

I am having trouble finding a place to buy brass rods or brass tubing to make those cute little flowers you have the pattern for. Any help? I live in Brampton Ontario Canada. I would appreciate any help you could give me. :D

Answer

Hi Judy,

I buy mine at a local hobby shop that specializes in model cars, trains and planes. The brand is K & S. I've also seen displays of K & S products in hardware stores.

Another thing you can use are brazing rods obtained from a place that specializes in welding supplies. They work well for a lot of stained glass projects. I use large brazing rods for garden stakes, and small ones for mandrels in bead making. Actually they would work just as well as the brass rods, and would be less expensive.

Have fun making flowers!

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Pigments For Stained Glass

by Rade Peters
(Belgrade, Serbia)

THE QUESTION IS WHAT KIND OF PIGMENTS I.E. PAINTS ARE USED FOR COLORING STAINED GLASS? ALSO WOULD APRECIATE INFO IN REGARD WHERE TO PURCHASE PIGMENTS PREFERABLY FROM A COUNTRY CLOSE TO SERBIA. OF COURSE E MAIL ADDRESS WILL HELP.

THANK YOU

Answer

I will give you two different answers here since I'm not sure if you're referring to the actual colored glass used in stained glass work, or traditional glass painting that is used to add features such as faces, hands, feet, folds in clothing.

For the glass used in stained glass work, various oxides are added with the other ingredients before it goes in the furnace. It is not colored afterwards. Each manufacturer has their own "recipe" for colors. The basic oxides used are: Copper oxide, under different conditions, produces ruby, blue, or green colors in glass. Cobalt is usually used to produce most shades of blues. Shades of green can also be obtained from the addition of chromium and iron oxide. Yellow glass is sometimes colored with uranium, cadmium sulfide, titanium, or fine selenium yellows as well as vermilions. Red glass is made by adding gold.

For traditional glass painting, the paints are made from finely ground glass and oxides, then mixed with various ingredients such as gum arabic, water, vinegar, etc, then applied with a brush and finally fired in a kiln. There is much more to it then my brief explaination, but that's enough to give you the general idea of how it's done. Glass paints are manufactured and sold through any large stained glass business that sells tools and supplies.

For an idea of the types of brushes and supplies needed for traditional glass painting look Here

I do not know where you would get the supplies in Serbia. I would think that Germany would be the best place to look for supplies.

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Stained glass keepsake boxes

by Lori Burke
(sussex WI)

I have just started stained glass. I had seen a box that had a wedding invitation in the lid of it. I am wondering the technique on how to put the invite between two layers of glass. Do you copper foil all the edges of each piece of glass and then solder it together? Again, just starting out. Signed up to start the box class in a few weeks.

Answer

Yes, you put the invite between two layers of glass, but don't foil the glass separately. Wrap a piece of transparent tape around the two pieces to keep them in place, then foil the two pieces as one piece.

You'll need a wider foil. I use 1/2" foil , then trim it back a little if it wraps around the glass too far.

Cut the transparent tape at the edges of the foil and peel it off. What's left under the foil won't hurt anything.

You do not want to wash the piece with water. If the foil hasn't been burnished well enough, water can seep in between the two pieces of glass and ruin the invitation.

I wipe it down with a paper towel that has a very little bit of flux cleaner on it. If you are going to patina the box, do the patina the same way...a little bit on a paper towel.

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Maximum panel size for a door

by Ian
(Bristol, UK)

Hi,

I want to make or commission someone else to make a stained glass panel to go in a internal door.

I worry about the size however, its 99cm x 59cm - do people consider that just too large for a door? It is internal and we have kids.

I have heard about getting it encased in a double glazed unit but worry about the look - what is the consensus on double glazed enclosed stained glass?

Many thanks for reading and any help,

Ian

Answer

We've constructed door panels from a small one foot square panel to the full size of the door. Size doesn't matter as much as how well it is reinforced both during the construction phase as well as when it is installed.

If you have children that could accidentally damage the stained glass, it might be wise to put a piece of laminated glass in front of it. That will make the door quite heavy, but it will also protect the children as well as the stained glass.

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Blocked light

I have a stained glass panel on one of our windows. It looks beautiful when light passes through it. I am now planning to make a cabinet behind it. I am afraid that will block light and make that stained glass panel look very insipid. Is there any solution? I want to build that cabinet behind it and yet not let the panel lose its beauty.

Answer

The best solution would be to put lights in the cabinet. Put the lights around the inside edges of the cabinet rather in the center. Lights in the center causes hot spots to show up in the stained glass panel. You want a soft glow from around the edges instead.

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Glass in Kitchen cabinets

by Carrie
(Sooke, BC)

Hi Sue, we are installing new cabinets in our kitchen. I got the store to not put a wood panel in the corner cabinet. I'm planning on designing something in glass, do you have any advise for me? I've only done copper foil. I may do a design and then put a mirror behind so you can't see into the cupboard. Thanks Carrie

Answer

I'd strongly advise constructing the panel with lead came and reinforcing it very well. Cupboard doors (any door for that matter) that is frequently opened and closed and often slammed, causes the glass to "oil can". Think of what happens when you squeeze then let go of an oil can...it moves in and out. The same thing happens to stained glass in a door. If the glass is foiled, the glass isn't going to be able to move, so it will either eventually break or pull loose from the foil from the constant in and out motion.

Lead came and putty cushions the glass, giving it some movement when the door is opened and closed or slammed. It is far less likely to break than a foiled panel. With lead came, putty (not cement), and proper reinforcement, your kitchen cupboard panel should last as long as the cupboard does.

If you make the panel with opalescent glass, you won't have to back it with mirror and you have the advantage of the panel looking good in all kinds of light. If you want, you can install some sort of lighting in the cupboard so the panel will look spectacular at night.

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cutting depression plates

by Brenda
(Bonner Springs, KS)

Can you tell me the best way to cut depression plates? I have been using them in stained glass projects. Would like to use them in corners of a square piece.

Answer

I have never cut plates, but I would use a ring saw to get the exact cuts you want.

Perhaps someone else reading this has had experience cutting depression plates and can tell you what they did. The answer will be in the comments section below here if anyone can help with an answer.

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Stained Glass in the Garden

by Debbie
(Wisconsin Dells, Wi USA)

I use the copper foil method and would like to make some projects to place in my garden. Should I be weatherizing my pieces.

Answer

I've made many garden stakes and have done nothing special to them. I do use copper patina because it oxidizes over time giving the stakes a lovely aged look.

Make sure you burnish the foil very well, and wax the pieces whether you patina or not. The wax will protect the pieces from the weather as well as make them gleam in the sunlight.



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Finishing the Water Prism

by Sue C
(Bemidji, MN)

Did I miss it? How to you finish the top where the chain comes out? Do you solder it? I would think refilling it would leave water marks, even with distilled water.


Answer

Before the two sections are soldered together, I thread a chain through a glass bead, drop the chain down through the top opening and put a ball of solder on the end of the chain that is inside the top section (make sure it's larger than the opening).

When the prism is complete, the solder ball on the end of the chain plugs the hole from the inside and the glass bead acts as a stopper on the outside of the opening.

If you're concerned about water marks, don't wait until the water is totally evaporated before you refill it. If you top it up every month or so you won't see any marks.


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Glass thickness

by Denise
(Cardiff)

Is it possible to use two different thickness of glass in the same glass project? I.e.. 3mm and 4mm together in the same project?

Answer

Most of my panels are made from various manufacturers glass, which means various thicknesses. Once the panel is soldered you'll never know the difference. If it really bothers you to work with 2 or 3 thicknesses of glass, build the panel up side down. Then the front will be all one level. However, like I said before, once it's soldered you'll never know the difference.

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