Oxidation on Patina

by Liz
(Virginia)

I made a panel for my bathroom window-copper foil-and put black patina on it. It has been up 2-3 months and the solder lines are turning white with oxidation. How can I fix this and how can I keep it from happening again?



Answer

Hi Virginia,

The oxidation is being caused by the moisture in the bathroom. If you've read my patina tutorial you'll know that patina doesn't like water.

Try waxing the window again. I recommend Mother's Gold Cleaner Wax. It's available at most car care centers. After you wax and buff, use a toothbrush along the edges of the foil where it meets the glass.

I don't know how you can prevent it from happening again unless you put a piece of clear glass over the stained glass. You'll still get moisture in there, but it might slow thing down.

This is where I need some input from people reading this question. If anyone has a good way to keep moisture from causing oxidation on a piece of stained glass installed in the bathroom, please let us know what you do. You can write your reply in the comments section below. Thanks!

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How do you fix a piece that has white and/or green oxidation?

by Leslie
(Interlachen, Florida)

I did a few pieces before reading your tutorial about using copper patina. The pieces have the beginnings of white oxidation spots on it and look terrible. Is there a way to go back and reclean and refinish these pieces so they aren't wasted?

Answer

Your pieces aren't wasted. Scrub the solder lines with fine steel wool or bronze wool. That will remove the old patina and any oxidation. Once the oxidation and patina is totally gone, follow my tutorial for applying patina.

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Haze running along the soldered and patina colored edges of glass

by Jillian
(Ky)

Find the Haze

Find the Haze

Hi, this is so frustrating. I put ALOT of effort into the production of a piece and at the end something goes wrong and my entire effort is for naught.

I make small panels and suncatchers, using the copper foil on the inside pieces, and a Zinc or Lead came border.

When I finish soldering, I wash the piece THOUROUGHLY with Dawn and baking soda to make sure ALL flux is nuetral and gone. I let the piece dry. Then I will apply black patina to the entire piece with a bristled tooth brush. Once I achieve the right shade, I am very THOUROUGH to rinse the patina off of the glass pieces, and pat dry. Everything looks fine until the patina dries completely, and when I hold the piece up to the light, there is this haze on the border of EVERY piece that butts up to a soldered line. And it doesnt come off EVER, no matter what I try.
I thought it was maybe flux residue that burned into the glass, but thats not possible because I am CERTAIN I remove it. And I don't leave the flux on any longer than nessecary.
I thought it was the patina, but ditto the above statement^.

WHAT IS IT?!? Its driving me absolutely crazy. Professionally done pieces don't have hazes so I feel like I must be screwing up somewhere along the line.

Please help before I pull whats left of my hair out!

On the uploaded photo, where I drew on a red line. thats where the haze likes to appear, on EVERY single piece

Answer

Try cleaning the haze off with toothpaste. Plain toothpaste, nothing fancy. Then, on your next piece, try my way of cleaning and applying patina. You will find the instructions here. If you can't find the #98 scrub pads, get the sponge/pad combination made for scrubbing pots and pans, found at any supermarket. They're not as good, but will work in a pinch. When you do the final wax, don't let the wax dry before buffing, just put it on and wipe it off straight away. I'm quite sure you will be happy with the results of this cleaning and patina technique.

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White Residue on Patina

I made a set of suncatchers for my daughter's school as a fundraiser. I hurriedly finished them (patina included)and left on vacation. Ten days later I came home to find a white residue in the patina. It is not just on surface but also in crevices, cracks, etc. After reading your lesson, I think I can avoid it next time by better clearning, but how can I remove this residue and make them sellable?

Answer

The best way to get rid of the white residue is to remove the patina with bronze wool or very fine steel wool. Once the patina is off, follow the instructions on the Patina Tutorial.

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