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[Stained Glass Gems] Magazines for the Glass Hobbyist
January 16, 2011

Issue #26 A New Year

Greetings and Happy New Year to all of my stained glass friends. These Stained Glass Gems have been found during my frequent browsing and deep digging for helpful and or unusual stained glass web sites, as well as other information pertaining to stained glass. I do hope that there's a gem or two that will brighten your day and be helpful during your stained glass journey.

Stained Glass Blogs

The blogs I feature cover a variety of subjects and techniques. Some of the techniques will be different from the way I have demonstrated in my tutorials, but that doesn't mean that either their's or mine are the right way or the wrong way to do it. It's just another way of getting to the end result. I hope you enjoy the following blogs and perhaps learn something new.

Glass Tips is a nice resource for anyone that does fusing.

JasGlass Art Has interesting pieces that will put your creative minds to work.


Patterns

If you have been looking for authentic Frank Lloyd Wright, patterns, you will find a nice selection here. They aren't free patterns, but they look as though they are well worth the price. You can buy individual patterns or books for windows, lamps and mosaics. They also sell materials specific to FLW work.


Tutorials

How to Put Dried Flowers Between Glass

Flowers between glass

Cut two pieces of glass the same size or use one bevel and one piece of glass cut to the exact size of the bevel. Arrange flat dried flowers, wedding invitations, a picture, whatever you want, on one piece of glass. If you need to, you can use small dots of white glue to hold them in place. If you use glue, make sure the glue is dry before proceeding to the next step. If the glue is still wet, mold will grow over time...been there, done that :(

Put the second piece of glass over the one with flowers, tape the two pieces of glass together with scotch tape (this just makes it easier to handle the piece while doing the next step). Wrap the scotch tape around the two pieces of glass, horizontally and vertically.

Using a wide foil (I use 1/2"), wrap both pieces of glass together as though they are one piece of glass. Wrap the foil right over the scotch tape. Burnish the foil very well. You don't want any place where moisture can get under the foil and then between the 2 pieces of glass. Cut the scotch tape at the foil line (what's left underneath the foil doesn't matter) and remove any tape you can see. Then flux and solder, using the flux sparingly. You don't want any to seep in under the foil. Clean it up with flux remover (use as little as possible), and apply patina, again sparingly. I used to do dried flowers between glass, and found this to be the best way to prevent moisture from getting in there. If any moisture got in, the flowers would get moldy and believe me, that is a very unappealing sight.

Solder jump rings wherever they fit in the best. I always use two whether the piece is round or square.

Ways to Use Pressed Flowers With Stained Glass

Here's how I have used pressed flowers in my stained glass work. I put them between a bevel and a clear piece of glass. Add a hook and some ribbon and hang on the wall. You can also add a border of colored glass. I've done the same and used it as the center of a box lid. I cut out tiny circles of clear glass, add small flowers, cover with another circle, foil, solder, add a hook and ribbon and hang on the Christmas tree. They also look nice as a border around a mirror. Use your imagination...be creative. You just don't want to hang them where the sunlight will shine on or through them. Sun bleaches out the dried flowers very fast (like a week or so).

If anyone is interested in learning how to make a flower press and how to dry flowers please let me know. If enough of you respond, I'll do a tutorial on it in the next ezine.

How to Conserve Glass When Cutting

Laying out pattern pieces

I have been asked, many times, what is the most economical way to cut glass. When you're cutting glass, you should use a working piece instead of an entire sheet. That way, if something goes wrong, you won't lose the whole piece of glass.

Place a few pattern pieces on the glass, leaving enough room to cut around them. Trace around them, take them off the glass and cut that section of glass off from the rest of the sheet. I have drawn a line on the glass, in the picture, where it would be cut. Now you have a working piece.

Tip...As you can see in the picture, the glass has streaks in it. I have marked the pattern pieces with arrows showing which direction I want the streaks to run. That way you won't finish a panel only to see that the petals on a flower look kind of funny with the streaks running in several directions, or the background glass has a crazy patchwork effect that you didn't plan on.


Miscellaneous Stuff!

Do you have an original pattern that you designed, that you'd like to share with our visitors? Show the world what you can do. Upload your pattern here: Share Your Original Patterns

The Winter Score #113 is out. Great patterns as usual.

Delphi Glass is having a Stained Glass Supplies Sale It includes Kokomo glass, Beginner Kits and Spooled Lead Came.

I am working on a new ebook about Kaleidoscope Making. I hope to have it done by early March. It will have lots of step by step pictures and include ways to make several different types of kaleidoscopes. I've been making kaleidoscopes for over 20 years, and I find that they sell very well (I sell mine for $100 and up). I've never met a person that doesn't love to look through them.

You can find full details about all of my Ebooks Here
The books available are:
Make a Box With a Hinged Lid
Learn the Copper Foil Technique
Learn the Lead Came Technique
Frequently Asked Questions About Patina
Frequently Asked Questions About Copper Foil



A company that I now do business with, and recommend, is Wholesalers USA They carry lots of bits and pieces that we use in stained glass work. They have beach glass, gems, marbles, adhesives, jewelry supplies, etc all at very good prices.


Go to SmartFlix.com How-To DVDs to find hundreds of "How To" DVD's for rent. They have some very interesting stained glass tutorials that can be found at Glass


Best deals in art glass suppliesDelphi Stained Glass Supplies is a place where I have bought supplies online and over the phone for many years. Some very helpful people work there, and I recommend Delphi as a reliable place to order your supplies.




Have a look at Robert Oddy's web site for some unique patterns, plus a free pattern to show you what the patterns and instructions guides are like.
All designs feature:
Three-dimensional layering that creates depth in your designs - taking you well past the two dimensions of basic stained glass.
Full-color instructional guides for every step in the construction process.
Full-scale patterns ready to print as many times as you need for your project.
Supply lists for each design to help make sure you have everything you need.
Extra construction tips take you beyond the simple skills you learned as a beginner!

Although Robert's patterns aren't for beginners, I know there are a lot of you that are very capable of working with them. These patterns will make your skill level grow by leaps and bounds and you'll learn new techniques that you won't be taught in any classroom. Have a look at what he has to offer and download that free pattern...it's beautiful and something I know most of you would love to make.




Just in case you don't know, the Stained Glass Gems ezine is mailed out the third Sunday of each month. Be on the look out for [Stained Glass Gems] Issue 27 on Sunday, February 20th.

I want to encourage you to have fun and experiment with your glass. Try new things and different techniques. It's amazing what you can do when you "think outside the box."

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Stained Glass Patterns and Tutorials

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"He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands and head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands, head, and heart is an artist." ~Saint Francis of Assisi


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